PLEASE NOTE! An earlier version of this announcement said to meet at the Plymouth Road location or at Magee Marsh at 8:30 AM. This is incorrect; participants not meeting at Plymouth Road should meet at the Magee Marsh Location at 7:15 AM. 

Magee Marsh is an internationally renowned migrant trap where birds stop to refuel before their long flight across Lake Erie. Warblers, flycatchers, sparrows, and thrushes are just some of the many types of birds you can see there. Birders may see more than 100 species. Meet at the park-and-ride lot at Plymouth Road and US 23 at 5:50 AM to arrange carpools for a 6:00 AM sharp departure. Or meet the group at the warbler sign near the boardwalk entrance at Magee Marsh at 7:15 AM. Karen plans to return in the late afternoon, but individual drivers and their carpools may arrange to come back at any time.

Leader: Karen Markey

The Washtenaw County May Count is coming up very soon, and we hope you can join us in the field at this bountiful time of the year for bird-finding!

Please note that new information has just been posted about the procedures for the May Count. Visit our May Count Page for more information, and as always, ask the Count Compiler (contact information on the May Count Page) if you have any questions!

Much like I did last year, I’d like to start off this year’s CBC report with an administrative note. As we were gathering for the potluck-tally at the Matthaei Botanical Gardens, Mike Kielb pointed out that this year’s count really should be noted as Ann Arbor’s 72nd edition of the CBC, not the 71st. This due to the somewhat obscure 1947 edition, which was listed as count 1b in the booklet “Fifty Years & Counting,” written in early 1997 by Rob and Nancy French and Mike Kielb. Doing the math, Mike is absolutely correct: the 2017 Ann Arbor CBC was, in fact, the 72nd time the event was run! Amazing stuff, and as good an indication as any to show what a committed birding community the Ann Arbor area has—here’s to 72 more!

The 2017 Washtenaw County May Count is finally a wrap! Our total of 171 bird species observed stands respectable among the totals of years past, with 132 expected species and 39 unusual species for the area. Last year we observed 176 species. This year we had dozens of volunteers fan out throughout the county, searching for birds, and recording everything in eBird, a citizen science project, though Cornell University. Now, instead of our results being buried in the obscure scientific journal, Michigan Birds and Natural History, to be published several years after the fact, scientists have access to our data in real time. Was it a light migration in mid-May for common Warbler species? Yes, it was, as we can see from our County Results. If I am a scientist studying trends from this year’s migration, I have the Washtenaw County data at my fingertips, right in eBird. For the complete count of species by Townships, click here.

During the potluck-tally gathering at the closing of this year’s Ann Arbor Christmas Bird Count, we discussed if the 2016 edition was the tenth anniversary of my role as count compiler. Neither the previous compiler, Nancy French, nor I was sure when the baton was passed from her to me, but after reviewing my CBC records, I found that 2007 was my inaugural year as compiler, which means that this year, 2016, was, indeed, my tenth year in charge of the Ann Arbor CBC—how time flies!

Saturday, May 14, the second Saturday of the month, dawned cold and wet. There were freezing conditions forecast, with gale force winds, and it was nearly so at 5 a.m. when my husband, Scott, and I set out from home to begin our Spring Migration count in Lodi Township. All over the county, birders were up early - obscenely early - to count birds. 91 birders, to be exact, 20 more than last year. All pitched in for a massive volunteer effort to count all the birds, all the species in our county.

Our hardy group of nine Washtenaw Audubon birders braved a 25-degree windchill and heavy-at-times snow showers in search of spring migrants in the Arb. We lingered for a long time where ground litter obscured a Fox sparrow and Winter wren. Suddenly the Fox sparrow perched in the open where everyone had long and close looks; a Hermit thrush perched even closer displaying his profile and straight on. We met Andrew Pawluk at the boardwalk who put us onto a Winter wren.

In my announcement article from early November I speculated about the possible impact the weather in general, and el Niño in particular, might have on our count. Well, as I’m looking over the results from our efforts on December 19, I can only imagine that the mild conditions that dominated southern Michigan during the fall months and into December resulted in a decidedly interesting outcome.

On Saturday, February 20, 2016, a small group of Washtenaw Audubon members (and friends) took advantage of the extremely pleasant weather to visit Kensington Metropark to see what birds might be about. First stop was the Heron Rookery where a lone Great Horned Owl hunkered down on a nest.

On Saturday (January 16, 2016), 16 intrepid birders attempted to see what sorts of wintering birds could be found. We started by cruising the country roads of the eastern part of Washtenaw County, specifically Vreeland and Gotfredson Roads. We enjoyed a couple of cooperative Kestrels and a nice flock of Horned Larks in the snowy fields, but were unable to locate the previously seen Snow Buntings.